Think Blog

Design ideas, wit, and wisdom from Think Company.

Think Remote: Highlights from 3 Months Working Abroad

Have you ever felt like you need to mix things up—to try something new or give your life a hard refresh? Life can become so routine if you let it: wake up, go to the office, spend time with friends and family, stay active, fight the good fight, volunteer, and hang out on social media. But maybe you want more. What if you’re scrolling through your news feed and see a long lost friend announce they’re selling everything to travel the world to work remote for an entire year. Would you think, “this could be me!”? This was me this … Read more of the post Think Remote: Highlights from 3 Months Working Abroad

How to Use Airtable for Content Audits, Part 2

In part 1, we established that Airtable is a super useful tool for handling content audits. Now, for part 2, we’ll dive into a detailed explanation of how the Airtable content audit template is set up. This tutorial assumes: You do have a basic understanding of what a content audit is (if you don’t, consider taking a brief detour to this article) You don’t have a basic understanding of how to work in Airtable (if you do, you can probably skim or skip this) PART 1: Getting started with Airtable (1.1) Sign up for a free Airtable account. (A free … Read more of the post How to Use Airtable for Content Audits, Part 2

How to Use Airtable for Content Audits, Part 1

Airtable is a web-based tool that makes it easy to build relational databases and spreadsheets—so easy you could use it to make a grocery list, but also so robust you could use it to build a CRM or analyze UX research. Or, if you’re a content strategist, you can use it to make many aspects of your work easier and more productive. A great place to start—for any project, and for getting a sense of how Airtable can work for you—is the content audit. This is part 1 of 2 posts about Airtable for content audits. Part 2 is a … Read more of the post How to Use Airtable for Content Audits, Part 1

The Content Strategy of Civil Discourse, Part 2

In part one, we discussed the current landscape for (un)civil discourse online. In this part, we’ll start to dig into why that is. The common wisdom is that if you produce an outrage-inducing headline, people will share it. The more people share it, the more people will click on it, read it, and click on the ads, and that’s what we’re all here for anyway, right? The problem with this theory is that, even under the best of circumstances, if this works, argument replaces community. And if all you’re able to muster is outrage and argument, you won’t make any … Read more of the post The Content Strategy of Civil Discourse, Part 2

The Content Strategy of Civil Discourse, Part 1

Here’s a fun experiment. Show an audience the following photo and ask… “Should this person drive this car?” What you’ll get is a policy discussion. “Of course not! Old people are bad at everything!” “That’s ageist! People should be able to do what they want!” All you will learn at the end of that conversation is who is on what side. Show that same photo to a different audience and ask… “How might this person drive this car?” What you’ll get is a design discussion. “What if we moved the steering wheel?” “What if we had a heads up display … Read more of the post The Content Strategy of Civil Discourse, Part 1